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Items filtered by date: September 2017

Word of the Week

 

Masticate /ˈmastɪkeɪt/

 

 

 

verb

 

Chew (food)

 

 

Example Sentences

• Food is masticated between horny plates located on each jaw.
• The party ate their portions in silence, masticating every crumb.
• I'll post a proper review when I've properly masticated the end.

 

 

Published in Word of the Week

OstrichFacts

 

ostrich2

 


1. Ostriches can live without water for a long period. As a result, they will absorb water from the food they
2. The dark male ostrich often sits on its eggs at night and his paler female mate during the day.
3. Ostrich DO NOT bury its head in the sands like what many people believe. It only appears so especially when it cannot run away from potential danger, it always flops to the ground and lay still. The color of its heads camouflages with the sand.
4. An ostrich egg can weigh approximately 3 pounds. That is equal to two dozen of chicken eggs.
5. Ostriches have the largest eyes in the entire animal kingdom. They have three sets of eyelids. Their eyes are larger than their brain!!
6. Since they lack teeth, ostriches swallow gravels to grind their food, and an adult ostrich carries nearly one kilogram of stones in its stomach.
7. Ostriches are the fastest of all birds or any other two-legged animal, and they can sprint at more than 70 kilometers per hour, covering up to 5 meters in one single.
8. Ostriches are the oldest birds on Earth. They have existed for at least 120 million years.
9. In the 1700s, ostriches were occasionally harnessed and used to pull light carts in South Africa.
10. The Roman Emperor Heliogabalus formerly had the 600 ostriches’ brains served up at a feast during his reign 2 000 years ago.

 

 

Source: Interesting Facts

Published in Word of the Week

 A dog cannot bark and bite at the same time. 

 

— Chiga (Rwanda and Uganda) Proverb

  

Background, Meaning and Everyday Use of the Proverb:

The Chiga people, or Abachiga ("people of the mountains"), are an ethnic group located in northern Rwanda and southern Uganda. The Chiga speak a Bantu language called Rukiga. They are sometimes referred to as the Chiga or Kiga, while the singular form is Omukiga. Additionally, a large number of Abachiga were still living in Rwanda at the time of European colonization. DogThe Abachiga people live in southwestern Uganda and northeastern Rwanda, mostly located in Kabale District and Byumba Prefecture in Rwanda, and number about 8% of the population of Uganda or nearly three million according to population estimates.

The family of the ruling clan, the Bamuhutu, possessed the inheritance powers of the name Mukama. The Abukuru Bekika was a committee of elders chosen by the clan to issue rules and administer justice. If a case was particularly serious and involved more than one clan, the cases would be heard publicly. An Omukuru, ideally a wise elder who knew the customs and traditions of his people, and who could be trusted to give fair advice and justice, was elected to preside over this expanded court.

Before the Bachiga were educated about Islam and Christianity, they believed in one God. The Bachiga understood God as creator who is neither male nor female, known as Ruhanga. Abachiga were mainly agriculturalists, and kept significantly less livestock than the other pastoralist neighboring ethnic groups. They grew sorghum, peas, millet, sweet potatoes, vegetables, and beans.

The Bachiga were natural born-warriors. They were known as tough, hardworking people that made formidable enemies. The form of dance for the Chiga is called the Ekizino. Ekizino is a royal dance from the Chiga people of Kigezi. Musical instruments: Omukuli (flute): The flute is widely popular in all regions of Uganda. It is played both as a solo and accompaniment instrument. Amakondere (trumpets): Low-pitched instruments are cut from the trunks of the pawpaw tree. High-pitched trumpets are made of antelope horn among others.

A dog was one of the domestic animals in every Chiga homestead. It was one of the animals mostly domesticated for security. Through interaction and careful observation of this animal, the elders and wise people in the community learned that it could not bite and chew at one time, but it did one action before embarking on another.

The elders came up with the proverb to advise people, especially young people, to learn to focus their energy on one thing at any given time. Whenever you have two activities you will focus on one more than the other, thus not giving your best. For someone to be successful in life, they need to take a stand, focus and let others know they are people of integrity.

It was also used to teach community members to be firm on any decision they take and stand by it. They should not be like those people who support the king in one event and disown him in another. As a person of integrity, you should always do what you feel is right and stand by it at all cost.

 

Contemporary Use

In the modern world Christians have been caught between the love of money and the pleasures of the world and serving God. This has seen the rise and fall of prophets who are using the name of God to make themselves gain material things from unsuspecting congregations. Christians are focused on acquiring wealth through ungodly actions and at the same time they want to serve God. They want to please themselves with ungodly pleasure and at the same time they want to please God. This proverb tries to warn us Christians to choose life, Jesus Christ and emulate His ways. We should not focus on the worldly things, but on pleasing and serving our God Almighty and He will supply our every need.

 

 

Source: Afriprov

 

 

 

Published in African Proverbs

Facts Aquatic Animals

 

 shutterstock 92357491 500x412


 

#1 Jellyfish have been around for more than 650 million years, which means that they outdate both dinosaurs and sharks.

#2 An Electric Eel is known to produce electricity sufficient enough to light up to 10 electric bulbs.

#3 Dolphins sleep with only half of their brain and with one eye open so they can watch for predators and other threats.

#4 An Octopus has three hearts and the color of its blood is blue.

#5 At 188 decibels, the calls of blue whales is the loudest sound made by any animal on the planet.

#6 Oysters can change from one gender to another and back again depending on which is best for mating.

#7 Seahorses are the only animals in which the male, not the female, gives birth and care for their young.

#8 A shrimp's heart is in their head.

#9 Sea sponges have no head, mouth, eyes, feelers, bones, heart, lungs, or brain, yet they are alive.

#10 Turtles live on every continent except Antarctica.

#11 A shrimp's heart is in their head.

Source: All that is new

Published in Word of the Week

Water Fact

 

 WaterSplash


 

      • #1 There is the same amount of water on Earth as there was when the Earth was formed. The water from your faucet could contain molecules that dinosaurs drank.
      • #2 Water is composed of two elements, Hydrogen and Oxygen. 2 Hydrogen + 1 Oxygen = H2O.
      • #3 Nearly 97% of the world’s water is salty or otherwise undrinkable. Another 2% is locked in ice caps and glaciers. That leaves just 1% for all of humanity’s needs — all its agricultural, residential, manufacturing, community, and personal needs.
      • #4 Water regulates the Earth’s temperature. It also regulates the temperature of the human body, carries nutrients and oxygen to cells, cushions joints, protects organs and tissues, and removes wastes.
      • #5 75% of the human brain is water and 75% of a living tree is water.
      • #6 A person can live about a month without food, but only about a week without water.
      • #7 Water is part of a deeply interconnected system. What we pour on the ground ends up in our water, and what we spew into the sky ends up in our water.
      • #8 Water expands by 9% when it freezes. Frozen water (ice) is lighter than water, which is why ice floats in water.

Source: Safewater

Published in Word of the Week

Water Fact

 

 WaterSplash


      • #1 There is the same amount of water on Earth as there was when the Earth was formed. The water from your faucet could contain molecules that dinosaurs drank.
      • #2 Water is composed of two elements, Hydrogen and Oxygen. 2 Hydrogen + 1 Oxygen = H2O.
      • #3 Nearly 97% of the world’s water is salty or otherwise undrinkable. Another 2% is locked in ice caps and glaciers. That leaves just 1% for all of humanity’s needs — all its agricultural, residential, manufacturing, community, and personal needs.
      • #4 Water regulates the Earth’s temperature. It also regulates the temperature of the human body, carries nutrients and oxygen to cells, cushions joints, protects organs and tissues, and removes wastes.
      • #5 75% of the human brain is water and 75% of a living tree is water.
      • #6 A person can live about a month without food, but only about a week without water.
      • #7 Water is part of a deeply interconnected system. What we pour on the ground ends up in our water, and what we spew into the sky ends up in our water.
      • #8 Water expands by 9% when it freezes. Frozen water (ice) is lighter than water, which is why ice floats in water.

Source: Safewater

Published in Word of the Week

Facts about John Logie 

 

| Inventor Television  

 

 


In the early 20th Century it was a dream of many scientists to create the television. Here are 10 facts about John Logie Baird, the Scottish engineer who realized this dream.


    • #1 Baird showed ingenuity at an early age

      n Logie Baird

      John Logie Baird was born on 14 August 1888 in Helensburgh, Scotland. When he was a child he manipulated the telephone exchange in a way that his bedroom was connected to those of his friends across the street, thus showing early signs of innovation.

    • #2 His early inventions weren’t successful

      In his twenties, Baird made an attempt to create diamonds by heating graphite. His experiment led to shorting out Glasgow’s electricity supply. He was able to create a glass razor which was rust resistant but it shattered.

    • #3 He never graduated

      Baird was troubled by ill-health throughout his life. Due to this he was not admitted to the forces during the First World War. As a result of the War his BSc course at the University of Glasgow was interrupted and he never returned to complete his graduation. Instead, he set up a small business manufacturing and marketing a water-absorbent sock.

    • #4 He was the first to transmit a television picture

      In 1920s Baird dedicated himself to creating a television. By 1924, he was successful in transmitting a flickering image across a few feet. On October 2, 1925 he managed to transmit the first television picture with a gray-scale image in his laboratory. He was so excited that he ran to a shop across the street and convinced a boy to be part of his television transmission

    • The first photograph of a moving image

      The first known photograph of a moving image produced by Baird’s televisor, circa 1926

    • #5 He is the inventor of the world’s first television

    • On 26 January 1926, John Logie Baird gave the world’s first demonstration of true television in London in front of scientists and a reporter from The Times. It was the first demonstration of a system that could broadcast live moving images.

      A Baird Televisor

      A Baird Televisor, one of the first ever television sets

      #6 His company transmitted the first transatlantic television signal

      In 1927, Baird transmitted television signal over 438 miles of telephone line between London and Glasgow. Later that year he set up the Baird Television Development Company Ltd. The following year BTDC achieved the first transatlantic television transmissionbetween London and New York.

      Early television broadcast

      An early experimental television broadcast

      #7 He created the first 3D television

      On 3 July 1928, Baird was able to demonstrate world’s first color transmission and in August that year, he also demonstrated stereoscopic television, the first 3D television. In 1939, he demonstrated a color television which used a cathode ray tube and in 1944, he gave the world’s first demonstration of a fully electronic color television display.

      First Color Televised Image

      The first photograph Color Televised Image Ever Published

      #8 He developed an early video recording system

      Baird also developed a system of recording television to disc, which he calledPhonovision. He was however unsuccessful in replaying the recordings which prevented further development of the system. It was restored recently by a Scottish engineer and the world’s first video recordings can now be seen.

      Baird Demonstrating

      Baird Demonstrating

      #9 He married a South African pianist

      Baird married at the age of 43 to South African pianist Margaret Albu. The couple had two children: Diana and Malcolm. Baird suffered a stroke in February 1946 and he died on June 14 the same year. He is buried with his mother, father and wife in Helensburgh Cemetery.

      John Logie Baird Statue at Helensburgh

       

      John Logie Baird Statue at Helensburgh

       

    • #10 He is considered as one of the Greatest Britons

      John Logie Baird was ranked 44 in a poll conducted by BBC in 2002 in the United Kingdom to rank the 100 Greatest Britons in history. In 2006, he was named as one of the10 greatest Scottish scientists ever. Australian television’s Logie Awards are named in his honour.

Source: Learnodo

Published in Word of the Week

Mike Adenuga Biography

Michael Adeniyi Agbolade Ishola Adenuga Jr (born 29 April 1953) is a Nigerian business tycoon, and the second-richest person in Nigeria. His company Globacom is Nigeria's second-largest telecom operator, and also has a presence in Ghana and Benin. He also owns stakes in the Equitorial Trust Bank and the oil exploration firm Conoil (formerly Consolidated Oil Company). Forbes has estimated his net worth at $5.8 billion as of 2017, which makes him second-wealthiest Nigerian behind Aliko Dangote, as well as the third-richest person in Africa with a net worth of $14.1 billion.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Founder of Globacom, Chairman of Conoil (April 1953)
Synopsis
Mike Adenuga, Nigeria's second richest man, built his fortune in telecom and oil production. His mobile phone network, Globacom, is the second largest operator in Nigeria with 36 million subscribers; it also has operations in Ghana and the Republic of Benin. His exploration outfit, Conoil Producing, operates 6 oil blocks in the Niger Delta. He also owns real estate firm Proline Investments, which has hundreds of properties throughout Nigeria. Adenuga studied in the United States, getting an MBA at Pace University in New York, where he worked as a taxi driver to support himself. He returned to Nigeria and made his first fortune trading lace and Coca-Cola. Along the way he made friends with Nigerian military bigwigs who awarded him lucrative state contracts; those formed the foundation of his fortune. His estimated net worth is lower this year due to the drop in value of Nigeria's currency, challenges in the oil sector, and overall weakness in Nigeria's economy.


Early Life and Education

His father, the Oloye Michael Agbolade Adenuga Sr, was a school teacher, his mother Juliana Oyindamola Adenuga (née Onashile, of Okesopin, Ijebu Igbo) a businesswoman of royal Ijebu descent. 

 

Adenuga received his secondary school education at Ibadan Grammar School, Ibadan, and Comprehensive High School, Aiyetoro, for his Higher School Certificate (HSC). He worked as a taxi driver to help fund his university education. He graduated from Northwestern Oklahoma State University and Pace University, New York with degrees in Business Administration.

 

Career

In 1990, he received a drilling license and in 1991, his Consolidated Oil struck oil in the shallow waters of Southwestern Ondo State, the first indigenous oil company to do so in commercial quantity.

 

He was issued a conditional GSM licence in 1999; after it was revoked he received a second one when the government held another auction in 2003. His telecom company Globacom spread quickly and started challenging the giant MTN Group. It launched services in Benin in 2008, and has continued its spread across Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire, with more licences currently being prospected in other West African countries.

 

He was named African Entrepreneur of The Year at the maiden African Telecoms Awards (ATA) on 15 August 2007.

In 2009, Adenuga was detained for money laundering by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission. Adenuga left the country and lived in London until the Umaru Musa Yar'Adua regime granted him a pardon.

 

In May 2015, Adenuga made a takeover bid to purchase Ivorian mobile telecom's operator Comium Côte d'Ivoire for $600 million.

In June 2016 it was revealed that Adenuga was being pursued for a combined debt of USD $140.5 million, after his company ConOil failed to pay debts owed to, among others, the French oil giant Total. Bellbop, another company owned by Adenuga, has an interim injunction placed on it by the High Court in Lagos, after failed to pay USD $9.4 million it owed to the US oil and gas firm Baker Hughes

 
Published in World Icons

Word of the Week

 

Masticate /ˈmastɪkeɪt/

 

 

 

verb

 

Chew (food)

 

 

 

 

Example Sentences

• Food is masticated between horny plates located on each jaw.
• The party ate their portions in silence, masticating every crumb.
• I'll post a proper review when I've properly masticated the end.

 

 

Published in Word of the Week
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